Look No Further: This Is "The Best Sex Advice Science Has to Offer"

Kelsey Clark
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Original Illustration by Stephanie DeAngelis

As human beings, we all have an innate desire to be sexually confident and capable. But rather than falling down an internet rabbit hole of strange Google searches, we can look to sex researchers and social scientists for the proven ways to heighten and enhance our sex lives. Below, read up on "the best sex advice science has to offer," as originally aggregated by The Science of Us.

Make your partner feel special: According to a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, a little attentiveness outside of the bedroom can go a long way between the sheets. Couples who feel that their partner is responsive to their needs harbour a greater sexual desire for each other—and have more sex than couples who fail to tend to each other's emotional needs.

Understand that having good sex takes work. Like many things in life, the way you think about sex can actually shape your sexual chemistry with someone, according to University of Toronto researcher Jessica Maxwell. If you believe that good sex should come naturally if you're with the right person, your sex life will likely be sub-par. Conversely, couples who believe you have to put effort into good sex ultimately had more satisfying sex lives (and relationships).

Don't study articles on sex—study your partner. If you want to be "good" at sex, the first thing you should do is stop studying articles about being good at sex, says sex researcher Nicole Prause. The path to true sexual nirvana lies within your partner, and your ability to communicate with each other. Noises and expressions won't suffice—you must rely on open rapport and positive guidance.

For more, read up on the 13 questions close couples can answer, and share your sex advice with us below!

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