7 Unprofessional Email Habits That Could Ruin Your Reputation

Lauren Powell
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@harperandharley

With email being such an important tool in today’s professional world, it’s important our email etiquette is mastered. And while it’s near impossible to send a perfect email every single time, the last thing we need is an upset co-worker or an unimpressed client over a simple email faux pas.

Business Insider Australia asked experts to highlight some of the least professional behaviours you could demonstrate when sending an email and have compiled the ultimate list of mistakes you should avoid at all costs. From sending emails that aren’t urgent to not including a subject line, consider this your little black book of email etiquette. Read and to find out how to stay professional (and liked!) every time you press send.

Sending 'urgent' emails that aren't urgent

“Like the boy who cried wolf, if you abuse the urgent marker, it won't be long until no one will pay any attention to it.” — Rosemary Haefner, chief human-resources officer for CareerBuilder

Annoying punctuation

“People sometimes get carried away and put a number of exclamation points at the end of their sentences. The result can appear too emotional or immature. Exclamation points should be used sparingly in writing.” — Barbara Pachter, author of The Essentials of Business Etiquette.

Bcc'ing

“I am not a big believer in blind copying people on emails. When I have been bcc'd, the first thing I think is, 'If she is bcc'ing me on this, who else has she bcc'd on other emails?’” — Vicky Oliver, author of '301 Smart Answers to Tough Business Etiquette Questions

Replying all

“Email is not a party in the break room, it's a communication tool. If you're responding to an email sent out to a group, be sure you are only hitting 'reply all' if your reply is truly necessary for everyone to receive.” — Rosemary Haefner, chief human-resources officer for CareerBuilder

Sending too many personal emails

“No matter how well-meaning you are, bombarding your coworkers' email on a daily basis can prompt them to auto-delete.” — Rosalinda Oropeza Randall, an etiquette and civility expert.

Unprofessional fonts

“Generally, it is best to use 10- or 12-point type and an easy-to-read font such as Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman.” — Barbara Pachter, author of The Essentials of Business Etiquette.

Being snippy

“People always remember the mean email which is why you must not send one.” — Vicky Oliver, author of '301 Smart Answers to Tough Business Etiquette Questions

To find out what other common email mistakes could be making, head to Business Insider Australia and shop the desk essentials every career girl needs.

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